Effort is key and sitting with uncertainty

The Sparkle Experiment small creative play equals connection

Do you believe every person has the potential to be creative through practice, or that you’re born naturally talented? The answer reveals whether you have a growth (there’s potential) or a fixed (born that way) mindset. Having a fixed mindset will limit your potential for growth and development because as Carol Dweck in Mindset suggests, “No matter what your ability is, effort is what ignites that ability and turns it into accomplishment.” Effort is key because talent only gets you so far in the beginning. Effort will take further in the long run, but only if you’re willing to persistently and consistently show up.

Shaun McNiff in Trust the Process notes when viewing children’s art we can see every child has the ability and permission to create. But through a schooling experience, “freedom is restricted for the majority of people as the identification of “talent” tends to overshadow universal participation.” We get disheartened if our art isn’t ‘good’ enough and believe we should stop if doesn’t showing visible signs of ‘talent.’ McNiff argues that a person’s license to create cannot ever be taken away, it’s “as natural as breathing and walking.” This can be a challenging notion to accept if you believe you’re not creative either by self-judgment or through the judgment of others. Is it is possible to move from not-being-creative to being-creative? Always. McNiff encourages “Training in creativity requires the ability to relax in periods of uncertainty and to trust that the creative intelligence will find its way” as well as “an inclination to step into the unknown as well as the ability to persist when there is no end in sight.”

If you can spend a few moments sitting with the uncertainty, (the uncomfortable feeling of not-knowing) not rushing the feeling away or stopping the art-making process, you will discover that the uncertainty will rise and fall if you allow it to just be. Whisper some encouraging words to yourself, take a breath and continue to make your art.

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Self-confidence when navigating the unknown

The Sparkle Experiment small creative play equals connection

How do we gain (and keep hold of) confidence when practicing making art considering most of the time, we make everything up as we go? When creativity is so varied, fluid and intangible, it’s no wonder we can feel lost when making something new. But it’s normal to feel like your making everything up as you go as Steven Pressfield in The Artist’s Journey explains “No matter what a writer or artist may tell you, they have no clue what they’re doing before they do it—and, for the most part, while they’re doing it.”

How is it possible to gain confidence when navigating the unknown of your own creativity? What would that look like on a daily basis? Perhaps confidence isn’t feeling 100% sure of what you’re doing, but instead is knowing you’re actually trying something new. You’re taking action and that’s incredibly brave. Carol S. Dweck in Mindset encourages us “True self-confidence is “the courage to be open—to welcome change and new ideas regardless of their source.” Real self-confidence is not reflected in a title, an expensive suit, a fancy car, or a series of acquisitions. It is reflected in your mindset: your readiness to grow.”

Having confidence of steel about your art is something you may never gain. Even a master artist with decades of experience will have days when they question everything they make. Take comfort that if they still doubt their art, it’s okay that you do. Sustainable confidence is grown through small incremental steps over time, especially when trying something new. Making mistakes, failing and regularly practicing is all part of the mix, providing valuable data about your own creative tastes and to highlight areas for future growth and practice. Allow yourself to be open to change by making art and see how your confidence gently grows over time.

“In order to discover new lands, one must be willing to lose sight of the shore for a very long time.” — Andre Gide

Adopting a growth mindset to plunge and stick

The Sparkle Experiment small creative play equals connection

Do you have a fixed mindset or a growth mindset when it comes to your creativity? Carol S. Dweck’s work on the mindset psychological trait explores the differences:

  • Fixed believes: your basic qualities (intelligence, talent) are fixed traits so talent with no effort creates success
  • Growth believes: your basic qualities can be developed through dedication and work, creating resilience and an enjoyment of learning

In Mindset: The New Psychology of Success, Dweck explains “When you enter a mindset, you enter a new world. In one world—the world of fixed traits—success is about proving you’re smart or talented. Validating yourself. In the other—the world of changing qualities—it’s about stretching yourself to learn something new. Developing yourself.” With a growth mindset, developing and learning is the goal and talent or natural ability isn’t necessary for success. You don’t even need confidence to start: “In the growth mindset, you don’t always need confidence… when you think you’re not good at something, you can still plunge into it wholeheartedly and stick to it.”

Plunge and stick. How would your art making practice benefit if you took this approach? Ignore the fear and plunge anyway. Stick to it and commit for the long haul. If you feel your skills aren’t up to scratch, it doesn’t mean you can’t improve over time. Dweck argues “Just because some people can do something with little or no training, it doesn’t mean that others can’t do it (and sometimes do it even better) with training. This is so important, because many, many people with the fixed mindset think that someone’s early performance tells you all you need to know about their talent and their future.”

It’s important not to take the memory of making ‘bad art’ as a child to convince and reinforce the “I’m not creative” identity as an adult. That kind of thinking is a fixed mindset which creates no space for future development and growth. Take the plunge and adopt a growth mindset to gives yourself the permission to create.

“Becoming is better than being.” The fixed mindset does not allow people the luxury of becoming. They have to already be.” – Carol S. Dweck